Medium Has Become a Cesspool of Faux Experts, Bro-Preach, and Spam

I’m on a zero-fucks tour and I’m tired of reading garbage in my feed

Felicia C. Sullivan

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Photo by Noah Buscher on Unsplash

Let’s first discuss the relentless spam, shall we? While it’s true my Instagram account with its 70 followers will attract the occasional fem-bot vying for my dollars and undivided attention, the spam on Medium is relentless and unyielding. From porno and drug-peddling accounts (fentanyl, anyone?) to crypto bros and SEO-hacks peddling self-help, there are more people who want to hock their trash than those who want to read your work.

Every single day, dozens of spam accounts follow me — they’re not humans who want to connect with others, they’re spam pulling images off the internet as profile photos that want to build accounts, peddle accounts, etc., and it’s clear Medium will do nothing to stop this.

Apparently, a higher active user count is good for business.

But let’s set aside the spam garbage and chat about “experts.” I’ve been on the platform since 2013, when an editor cajoled me to pen blogs about food and personal essays because tech bros had become too ubiquitous. Medium was the wild west because, unlike Wordpress, they put resources against building an audience for their writers, which was attractive to me.

So, I published my best work here. I wrote hundreds of essays, marketing tutorials that amounted to books, which were subsequently taught at top MBA programs across the country, and literary fiction because I was foolish enough to believe good work prevailed. That work created by true experts and practitioners would rise above the din, but that isn’t the case. And it’s my fault — my fault for believing readers would be interested in doing the work (because wealth doesn’t happen for everyone and certainly not overnight), and writers would be interested in providing real value beyond padding their bank accounts.

Instead, I found bloggers with zero work experience repackaging advice from actual experts as their own. In a world where people are too lazy to Google, it’s easy to claim another’s experience as your own, especially on a platform that doesn’t fact — or expert-check. A platform that doesn’t ask — where is your data, your case studies, your experience

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Felicia C. Sullivan

Marketing Exec/Author. I build brands & tell stories. Hire me: t.ly/bEnd7 My Substack: https://feliciacsullivan.substack.com/ Brand & Content eBooks: t.ly/ZP5v